NEW NutritionConfidence recipe: Fish en Papillote

“Many people do not know how to cook fish or dislike making their entire kitchen smell like fish. Cooking fish en papillote (in a baking paper parcel) is an easy way around both these issues”, says Nathalie Mat, registered dietitian and creator of our latest NutritionConfidence recipe.

The fish used in this recipe is hake, a fish on the SASSI green list. You are welcome to use any other fish in the recipe. Choosing a SASSI green listed fish will ensure that your heart-healthy dish is also one that is healthier for the planet.

If you have “vegetable resistant” children, get them involved in packing their own parcels. They can choose more of the vegetable they prefer and limit the ones that they do not like. Involving children in cooking improves familiarity with foods and increases the likelihood that these foods will be eaten.

Ingredients per parcel

½ a yellow pepper

2 baby marrows

150-200 g hake fillet

1 slice of lemon

Black pepper to taste

Herbed dressing

30 g fresh parsley

10 g fresh basil leaves

1 tbsp capers

4 tbsp olive oil

Juice of ½ – 1 lemon (to taste)

Black pepper to taste

Method

  1. Heat the oven to 200˚C
  2. Fold baking paper to make a large square and then cut the folded paper like you did in school to make a rounded heart shape. Cutting a shape like this increases the amount of food you can easily seal into the parcel.
  3. Chop the pepper into batons; trim and quarter the marrows.
  4. The vegetables will form a bed on which we will place the fish. Open the baking paper and near the centre fold, make a layer of peppers. Top with a layer of marrows. Finally, place the fish on the marrows.
  5. Season the fish and place the lemon slice on top of the fish. To close the parcel, close the heart shape. With the edges lying together, start at the top of the heart, making small overlapping folds the whole way around to the bottom of the heart. Be sure to fold the bottom of the heart securely so that the parcel does not open in the oven.
  6. Place the parcel in the oven for 15-20 minutes. If the hake fillet is 2cm or thicker leave it in the oven closer to 20 minutes. If you have a thinner fillet the fish will be ready after 15 minutes. If you are not sure, this steaming method is a gentle way of cooking fish, leaving it up to 20 minutes should not be a problem. With practice, you will become more confident with this way of cooking.
  7. For the herbed dressing: put all the ingredients (start with the juice of ½ a lemon) and blend until nearly smooth. Check for acidity, add more lemon juice if needed and season to taste. Blend one last time.
  8. Serve by letting everyone empty their parcels onto their plates. Top the fish with 2-3 teaspoons of herbed dressing. This dish is delicious served with boiled baby potatoes or herbed whole-wheat couscous and a green salad.

The herbed dressing is delicious dotted onto the fish before cooking but it does lose its vibrant green colour when cooked.

 

Nutritional information per parcel (175g fish) with 3 teaspoons herbed dressing:

Energy: 1308 kJ; Protein: 37.2 g; Carbohydrates: 6.9 g; Fat: 14.1 g; Sodium: 268 g

 


Liquid Assets

Considering a juice fast? Read this first. Lauren Shapiro from My Kitchen magazine chatted to ADSA spokesperson and Registered Dietitian Nathalie Mat to find out if this is just another fad diet or if there is more to it:

ADSA_My Kitchen_Liquid Assets_April15

http://www.tfgclub.co.za/mykitchen

MyKitchen_April15 Cover


Skipping breakfast will do more than damage your health

It’s 6am, you are up and about and ready to start your day, but have no appetite or time to eat breakfast, and so you decide to postpone eating until the next meal of the day, which is only at 12pm. In essence, choosing not to eat breakfast means you are consciously making the decision to hamper your health as well as your performance at work or even at home. Perhaps it’s because you want to lose a few kilos?

Registered Dietitian Nathalie Mat puts that weight-loss myth to rest and explains how, by not eating breakfast, you are in fact depriving your body of sufficient nutrients that it needs in order to function on a daily basis. “Our bodies are not given any food overnight while sleeping, the first meal of the day helps to get our body started and get our metabolisms going,” says Mat. “Skipping breakfast is associated with higher weight gain and poorer performance.”

Perhaps you struggle to gulp down a meal in the morning due to the fact that you simply do not possess an appetite at that time. According to Mat, you are not alone: “Many people report having no appetite in the morning. I often find this is because they are eating too large a dinner. Reducing the size of your dinner may improve your morning appetite.” Choosing healthy foods that form a balanced meal will ensure your blood sugar levels are consistent meaning you won’t burn out later that morning, which is often the case.

“A healthy breakfast is a balanced one that includes a mix of wholegrain starchy foods (such as high fibre cereals, porridge, wholegrain or sourdough bread and even legumes like as beans or chickpeas) and protein rich foods (such as dairy products, eggs, lean meats or fish),” says Mat. “For example, it could be oats porridge with low fat milk, bran rich cereal with milk or wholegrain bread with some cheese, egg, beans or even peanut butter.” You can also add fruit to your breakfast. Fruit is a natural source of sugar but should be consumed as fresh fruit rather than juice if you want to control your blood sugar levels well.

Not only will eating a decent breakfast improve your performance throughout the day, but sustaining a lifestyle that is balanced in general will put diseases like cancer, strokes and heart attacks at bay. “Poor diet, physical inactivity and smoking are believed to contribute to those conditions,” says Mat. “These can be prevented by managing your lifestyle choices.”

The sooner you make the first step by eating the first, crucial meal of the day, the sooner you will begin living a more health and vitality-filled life.