The perfect Braai Day side dish!

If you are planning to celebrate Braai Day this weekend, add this delicious, South African Baby Marrow, Feta & Peppadew Salad to your menu. Created by dietitian and co-author of Eat Ting, Mpho Tshukudu, this salad is versatile and goes well with meat, chicken and fish.

Baby marrows are indigenous to South Africa. They make beautiful salads, soups, stir-fries and can also be used in baking to add moisture and fibre to the dish. They are a relatively low kilojoule vegetable and are a source of fibre and vitamin C.

INGREDIENTS

4 medium baby marrows (about 180 – 200g)

1/2 cup (125 ml) peppadew peppers, drained and roughly chopped and 1 Tbsp of the liquid

1 tsp (5 ml) + 1 Tbsp (15 ml) olive oil, divided

1 cup (250 ml / 220 g) halved cherry tomatoes – use different colours if available

Juice of 1/2 lemon

1 garlic clove, minced

2 Tbsp (30 ml) fresh thyme

3 Tbsp (45 ml) chopped chives

(60 g) feta cheese, broke into small pieces or cubed

Salt and pepper to taste

METHOD

Preheat grill to medium. Slice baby marrow into 1/2 cm rounds.

Toss the baby marrow with 1 tsp (5 ml) oil.

Lay the baby marrow on a hot grill and turn once water droplets form on top, and there are slight char marks on the heated side.

Place the baby marrow on a cooling rack to cool, in a single layer to prevent them going too soft

In a large bowl, toss together baby marrow, peppadew peppers, tomatoes, chives and thyme.

In a small bowl, whisk together the remaining oil, lemon juice, garlic and black pepper.

Add the dressing to the vegetables and toss to coat.

Add feta cheese.

 

NUTRITIONAL ANALYSIS PER SERVING

This recipe serves 4.

 

Energy: 113.75 kCal / 477.75 kJ

Carbs: 9.7 g

Protein: 4.2 g

Fat: 8.2 g

Sodium: 197.8 mg

Fibre: 1.5 g

 


NEW Recipe: Lettuce & Pea Soup

Our latest NutritionConfidence recipe is from the authors of Food for Sensitive Tummies, registered dietitians Cath Day and Gabi Steenkamp. A perfect winter warmer Lettuce & Pea Soup.

We love this recipe because it is a really smart way of including green leaves into your eating routine during the cold winter months! A great starter for a dinner party.

 The dietitians say:

  • This delicious soup contains a whopping 4 vegetable servings, making it a really healthy meal and gets you very close to your 5 a day quota.
  • In addition, it is high in fibre, making it the perfect meal for helping sensitive tummies keep regular. The fibre comes from the peas, chickpeas and the lettuce.
  • The benefits of increasing your fibre intake for gut health is well documented – healthy gut = happy you!

INGREDIENTS (Serves 4)

5 ml         butter (1t)

5 ml         olive oil (1t)

3 leeks    well washed and sliced with the green tops

1 ml         dried crushed garlic (¼ t)

2.5 ml     salt (½ t)

1              head of butter lettuce, finely sliced

250 g      frozen peas (1½ c)

1.25 L     boiling water (5 c)

15 ml      chicken flavour or vegetable stock powder (1 T)

125 g      tinned chickpeas (½ x 410 g tin, drained)

125 ml    chopped parsley (½ c)

METHOD

  1. Melt the butter and olive oil together.
  2. Add the leeks and crushed garlic and salt.
  3. Sauté over medium heat for 3 minutes until soft.
  4. Add the sliced lettuce and the peas.
  5. Add boiling water and stock powder.
  6. Boil for 5 minutes uncovered.
  7. Add the chickpeas and heat through.
  8. Add the parsley and liquidize until the soup is smooth.
  9. Reheat before serving.
  10. Optional: serve with one slice of bread with avocado as a topping, per serving (½ avocado is equivalent to 2 fats)

NUTRIENTS PER serving (200 ml of soup)

Energy                                   740 kJ

Protein                                   6.7 g

Carbohydrates                     28.0 g

Total sugars                         6.2 g

Added sugar                        0.0 g

Total Fat                                3.1 g

Saturated fat                         0.8 g

Fibre                                      6.4 g

Sodium                                 773 mg

One serving is equivalent to ½ carbohydrate, 1 protein and 4 vegetables.

FOOD FOR SENSITIVE TUMMIES

Do you suffer from winds, burping, cramps, heartburn, constipation and/or diarrhoea as well as bloating? Then the book, “Food for Sensitive Tummies” is for you! Having a sensitive tummy or super sensitive tummy (irritable bowel syndrome) can be one of the most debilitating health issues to deal with. In Food for Sensitive Tummies, Gabi Steenkamp and Cath Day show you how you can cut down on the ingredients and food that cause you problems and still prepare a whole range of recipes that are simple, affordable and delicious to eat. Their recipes also feed your gut microbiome with nourishing food substances important for maintaining health. From fresh and healthy breakfast ideas, to wholesome mains such as Butternut, Aubergine and Rocket Lasagne, cooking for sensitive tummies has never been so easyL 

Food for Sensitive Tummies can be ordered directly from the authors via this page or via email (info@catherineday.co.za or info@gabisteenkamp.co.za).


Turnip Tagliatelle with Chicken & Herb Sauce

Registered Dietitian and food blogger Cheryl Meyer, from Dish & Delite, kicks off our new series of NutritionConfidence recipes with a delicious ‘Turnip Tagliatelle with Chicken & Herb Sauce’. As always, the focus is on real food that is healthy and delicious, encouraging local, close-to-home ingredients.

We love this recipe because turnips are easy to spiralize and make lovely veggie noodles. When raw, they can tend to have a sharp distinct taste, warming them softens the flavour and makes for a perfect veggie noodle base for your dish.

Cheryl says: “Veggie noodles are a great way to the boost the vegetable component of a meal and plain yoghurt serves as a nutritious alternative in this twist on classic creamy carbonara.”

INGREDIENTS

(serves 4)

4 medium turnips

4 teaspoons olive oil, divided

4 chicken breasts, cubed (approx. 125 g each – 500 g)

4 leeks

250 g mushrooms

2 teaspoons crushed garlic

½ cup plain yoghurt

2 large eggs

30 ml fresh chopped parsley

¼ cup grated parmesan cheese

Salt and pepper, to season

METHOD

  1. Heat 2 teaspoons olive oil in a non-stick pan and cook the cubed chicken pieces. Set the cooked chicken aside.
  2. Slice the mushrooms and leeks.
  3. Heat the other 2 teaspoons of olive oil and soften the mushrooms and leeks. Just before cooked, add the garlic for the last 2 minutes. Remove and combine with the chicken.
  4. Peel turnips and cut the ends off flatly and evenly. Spiralize them to tagliatelle thickness (blade C on the inspiralizer).
  5. Boil turnip noodles for 2-3 minutes.
  6. In a small bowl or jug whisk the egg, yoghurt and parsley together well. Season with salt and pepper.
  7. When the turnip noodles are done, drain them, return them to the pot off the heat, pour in the egg mixture and toss until evenly coated (the warmth of the cooked noodles cooks the egg but it is important to do this off the heat, otherwise the egg will scramble when you add it, and we don’t want that).
  8. Serve the noodles topped with the chicken, leek & mushroom mixture and garnish with grated parmesan cheese.

 

Nutrition Information: Per serving

Energy: 1487 kJ Protein: 38.7 g Carbohydrate: 25.7 g Of which, total sugars: 11.0 g Fat: 14.8 g Fibre: 4.7 g Sodium: 303 mg

 

To find a dietitian in your area, visit http://www.adsa.org.za

 


CHICKEN SKEWERS, DIPS & SEED FLATBREAD

We love this recipe – it makes a delicious starter for summer entertaining. Making your own dips and marinade rather than using store-bought varieties gives you more control and means you know exactly which ingredients have gone into those dishes.

Not only are the chickpeas in the hummus rich in slowly-digested starch and fibre, helping to control blood sugar levels, but they are also a great source of plant-based protein, vitamins and minerals.

Using whole-wheat flour and oat flour in the flatbread adds healthy fibre, lowering the glycaemic index and aiding in blood sugar control. Because this is still a carbohydrate-containing food, people with diabetes should enjoy the flatbread in appropriate portions.

Homemade chicken skewers are a great lean protein option, and this protein further lowers the glycaemic index of the meal.

RECIPE (Serves 4 as a main or 8 as a starter/snacks)

Chicken skewers

600 g free-range chicken breast

2 lemons

1 Tbsp wholegrain mustard

salt & black pepper

30 g chopped oregano

8 sosatie sticks (you can cut them in half if you want smaller ones for snacks)

 TO MAKE IT

  • Cut the chicken breasts into cubes, about the size of an ice cube
  • Put the chicken in a mixing bowl, and add the zest and juice of the lemons, mustard, and chopped oregano, then season with salt and pepper.
  • Leave the chicken to marinade in the juices for an hour or so
  • Skewer the cubes of chicken onto the sticks
  • Put a pan onto a medium/high heat and add some canola oil
  • When the pan is hot, add your chicken skewers, and allow them to cook on the first side for about 2 or 3 minutes before turning them. Cook the other side for another 2 or 3 minutes and then check between the pieces of chicken to see that the flesh is white, and no longer translucent. You want the chicken to be cooked all the way through, but not dry. Remove from the pan and set aside until you are ready to serve.

Hummus

1 can chickpeas, drained

125 ml Extra virgin olive oil

Juice of 1 fresh lemon

salt & pepper

5 ml tahini

1 garlic clove, peeled

1 Tbsp toasted sesame seeds

 TO MAKE IT

  • Put the chickpeas, oil, lemon juice, garlic, tahini into a blender or food processor, and season with salt & pepper.
  • Blend together until smooth
  • Scrape the hummus from the jug with a spatula into a serving bowl
  • Top the hummus with toasted sesame seeds and drizzle with olive oil

Tzatziki

1 cup plain yoghurt

Juice of 1/2 a lemon

15 g fresh mint

salt & pepper

1/2 a cucumber

TO MAKE IT

  • Grate the cucumber into a bowl, and squeeze off the excess water
  • Add the yoghurt, lemon juice, mint, and season with salt & pepper and put into a serving bowl

 Tomato Pesto

100 g sun-dried tomatoes in oil

30 g roasted plain almonds

10 g fresh parsley, chopped

TO MAKE IT

  • Roughly chop the tomatoes
  • Put the sundried tomatoes with the oil into a blender
  • Add the roasted almonds & chopped parsley
  • Pulse the blender to combine the ingredients into a chunky pesto
  • Scrape from the blender into a serving bowl

Seed flatbread

100 g whole-wheat flour

100 g oat flour

150 g cake flour

100 g plain yoghurt

250 g water (lukewarm)

1 sachet yeast

2 tsp salt

50 g mixed seeds: sesame, flax, sunflower, poppy, pumpkin

TO MAKE IT

  • In a large mixing bowl, add the flours, yeast, salt and seeds and mix together
  • Mix together the water and yoghurt
  • Make a well in the middle of the dry mixture and gradually add the yoghurt/water mixture little by little and mix together to form a dough.
  • Stop adding liquid once the dough comes together, or add extra if you find the dough to be too sticky.
  • Knead the dough together to form an elastic ball of dough.
  • Separate the dough into golf ball sized balls
  • Put a griddle pan onto a medium high heat
  • Dust a clean working surface with a little flour, and roll each dough ball into a flat bread (about 3mm thick).
  • Place the flatbreads onto the hot griddle and allow to cook until a little golden and firm on the first side, and then repeat on the other side.

TO SERVE

On a large board or platter, place the flatbreads and drizzle with a little olive oil. Place your bowls of dips and you chicken skewers onto the platter and sprinkle with fresh herbs

 

 


Lentil, Pea and Sweet Potato Curry

Food blogger, Taryn Littleton, created this delicious curry for us.

We love the legume and sweet potato combo – both are sources of low glycemic index carbohydrates, rich in slowly digested starch and fibre, helping to control blood sugar levels.

Also, eating dry beans, peas and lentils at least 4 times a week can help prevent chronic diseases, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer and overweight, as well as improving gut health.

 

INGREDIENTS (serves 6)

  • 2 tbsp avocado oil
  • 2 onions, finely chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced (crushed)
  • 2 carrots, finely chopped or grated
  • 2 tsp grated fresh ginger
  • 2 tsp ground coriander
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • 1 tsp ground tumeric
  • 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp chili powder
  • 1 large sweet potato, peeled and cut into bite-size cubes
  • 1/2 cup red lentils
  • 5 tomatoes, chopped
  • 1 cup reduced fat coconut milk
  • 1 cup vegetable
  • 1 tsp garam masala
  • 1 pinch of salt
  • 1 tsp honey or brown sugar
  • 1 cup basmati rice
  • 1 cup green peas
  • 2 tbsp chopped fresh coriander
  • 1 tbsp lemon juice

METHOD 

  1. Heat the oil in a large saucepan over a medium heat and cook the onions for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  2. Add the garlic, carrot, ginger, ground coriander, cumin, turmeric and chili and cook, stirring, for 1 minute. Add the potato and lentils and stir to coat with the spice mixture.
  3. Add the tomatoes, coconut milk, stock, garam masala, salt and sugar, bring to the boil and cover with a lid.
  4. Reduce the heat to medium and simmer, covered, for 20 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  5. While the curry simmers, cook the rice.
  6. Add the peas to the curry and simmer, uncovered, for 5 minutes.
  7. Remove from the heat and stir in the coriander and lemon juice.

SERVING SUGGESTIONS

Tomato and onion salsa: Combine 2 tomatoes chopped and ½ onion finely chopped. Season, mix and enjoy served with your curry.

Serve on a bed of rice with a dollop of plain yoghurt and with a tomato and onion salsa.

VARIATIONS

  • Replace the coriander with fresh mint. Serve with naan bread instead of rice.
  • For more nutrients add in a cup of frozen veg.

NUTRITION INFORMATION per serving (excludes serving suggestions, recipe serves 6)

Energy: 1316 kJ Protein: 10.6 g Carbohydrate: 52.0 g Of which, total sugars: 9.4 g Fat: 8.2 g Fibre: 10.0 g Sodium: 302 mg

Source and image: Taryn Littleton for the Association for Dietetics in South Africa


Add to your ‘must try’ dessert list: Avocado Chocolate Mousse

Chocolateavomousse(3)We just couldn’t resist re-sharing this amazing ‘Raw Avocado Chocolate Mousse’ – a much healthier alternative to regular chocolate mousse and just as delicious. The mousse is packed with healthy unsaturated fat and an ideal alternative for vegans. It also contains none of the major allergens (cows milk, egg, soya, tree nuts, peanuts, wheat/gluten) and is ideal for individuals suffering from allergies to these food items. Developed by chef, Vanessa Marx, this should be at the top of your list of ‘desserts I must try’.

Our dietitians say:

Avocado pears contain primarily mono-unsaturated fats that have been shown to assist in keeping your heart healthy! They are also a good source of Vitamin E, which keeps your skin healthy and speeds up healing, as well as protecting red blood cells; Folic Acid, which helps with the production of red blood cells; and Selenium, which is an integral part of anti-oxidants (these help protect body cells from the damaging effects of free radicals and also needed for the proper functioning of the immune system)

RECIPE

Makes 4 portions

Ingredients

1 ripe avocado

1 ripe banana

1 orange

3 tablespoons cocoa powder

2 tablespoons xylitol

How to make it

– cut the avo in half. Remove the pip from the centre and discard. Remove and discard the skin too.

– in a food processor, add the avo, banana, cocoa powder, and xylitol.

– zest and juice the orange and add both to the food processor.

– blend the mixture until completely smooth and dark chocolate brown. The sweetness and darkness can both be adjusted by adding more or less xylitol and cocoa powder. The xylitol can also be substituted with honey, a low calorie or non-nutritive sweetener.

– you can remove the orange and replace with another flavour variation like cinnamon, lemon zest etc.

– spoon the mousse into 4 glasses for serving and refrigerate until ready to serve.

– serve with fresh fruit or biscotti

The nutritional value serves 4:

Energy: 1075 kJ

Protein: 3 g

Carbohydrate: 17 g

Total fat: 19 g

Dietary Fibre: 6.5 g

Sodium: 46 mg

To download the recipe card, visit http://www.adsa.org.za/Public/Recipes.aspx


New Recipe: Veggie Frittata

Our latest NutritionConfidence recipe (developed by chef Vanessa Marx) is quick, easy, packed with good nutrition, and a versatile choice for breakfast, brunch, lunch or dinner. It may sound exotic but a veggie frittata is really just a fancy omelette mixed with colourful vegetables and cooked in the oven.  Once you get comfortable making a frittata, branch out and make different flavours by swopping in seasonal vegetables like broccoli, cauliflower, tomatoes or spinach.

What the dietitian says: Eggs are a good source of high quality protein. They are also one of the few foods that contain high concentrations of Choline – essential for normal development and linked to improved memory and performance.

This recipe serves 8

INGREDIENTS

6 large free-range eggs

salt and pepper

1 tablespoon olive oil

½ a medium onion

½ a red pepper

2 courgettes

100 g mushrooms

100 g mozzarella, grated

50 g feta, crumbled

5 g Italian parsley, chopped

5 g fresh coriander, chopped

METHOD

  1. Preheat oven to 200°C.
  2. Beat the eggs together, season and set aside.
  3. Drizzle the olive oil into a large ovenproof, non-stick frying pan and set over medium heat on the stove.
  4. Slice up the onion, red pepper, courgettes and mushrooms.
  5. Add the sliced vegetables to the pan and fry until they begin to get a little colour.
  6. Add the beaten eggs and the cheese and mix slightly. Turn the heat down to medium-low and cook for three to five minutes until a crust begins to form on the bottom (do not stir the mixture).
  7. Place the pan in the oven and bake for 10 minutes until the mixture has set.
  8. Remove the pan from the oven and allow the frittata to cool slightly (five minutes).
  9. Tip the frittata out upside down onto a board or platter, sprinkle with the chopped parsley and coriander and serve warm.

NUTRITION INFORMATION: Per slice (8 slices per frittata)

Energy: 527 kJ Protein: 9.5 g Carbohydrate: 3.9 g Of which, total sugars: 2.6 g Fat: 9.6 g Fibre: 0.9 g Sodium: 195 mg


4 NUTRITION TIPS FOR HEALTHY LIFESTYLE AWARENESS MONTH

February is Healthy Lifestyles Awareness Month and with high rates of obesity and the so-called ‘lifestyle’ diseases, such as diabetes, it’s quite clear that South Africans need to develop more awareness about making healthy eating choices. We asked four of our dietitians what South Africans should know about nutrition:

  • Let’s head for the kitchen and start cooking, invites Cath Day, RD:

“My top tip to my clients is to start cooking your own healthy meals from scratch as often as possible, using the freshest and healthiest ingredients. It’s the best way to control not only everything that goes into your meal, but also portion sizes. If you cook often at home, you have full awareness of making healthy eating choices most of the time. Cooking with fresh, healthy ingredients, making delicious meals and snacks can easily be fun rather than a chore. You can cultivate a family culture of great enjoyment at healthy eating by involving your partner, your kids, the whole family, and even, friends in preparing and sharing healthy food.”

  • Let’s limit the sugar, advises Catherine Pereira, RD:

“ADSA supports the recommendations by the World Health Organisation (WHO) that added sugar intake should be limited to no more than 5 % of total energy intake. The South African Food Based Dietary Guidelines states that ‘sugar, and foods and drinks high in sugar should be consumed sparingly’. These foods include all types of confectionery (biscuits, cakes, etc.) as well as sugar-sweetened drinks. The key to getting this right is to become far more aware of ‘hidden’ sugars. We all know that when choose to eat a packet of sweets, we’re eating too much sugar; but we’re perhaps less aware that when we order an iced tea or a glass of wine at a restaurant, these also spike our daily sugar intake beyond sensible levels. When it comes to avoiding empty calories, what we drink counts every bit as much as what we eat; and we need a far higher level of awareness of our actual daily sugar intake in order to make sure we are keeping to the guidelines.”

  • Let’s get over obsessing over restrictive or fad diets, says Kezia Kent, RD:

“Following your friends’ latest diet or the newest fad promoted on social media is not necessarily going to work for you as it may be working for others. Eating healthily should be tailored specifically for you and it should happen every day, not just over a time when you are trying to lose weight. There is always going to be a ‘latest’ diet; and chopping and changing according to fads can prevent you from developing sensible and sustainable healthy eating habits that truly suit your lifestyle and your body. Especially, avoid diets that promise you’ll lose weight quickly. Slow, steady weight loss lasts longer than quick, dramatic weight loss. If you lose weight quickly, you may lose muscle and water which increases your chances of regaining the weight. If you need to change to healthier eating or need to lose weight, get professional advice to develop a sustainable plan for you.”

  • Let’s be careful about making carbs an enemy, warns Monique dos Santos, RD:

“There’s an immense amount of attention on low carb-high fat diets right now. We’ve got to keep the perspective that there are good reasons to include carbohydrates in our diets. Obviously, you want to limit sugar and refined starches, but there are carbohydrates in many, many foods that are good for us. Our bodies rely on a combination of carbohydrates and fat for energy to fuel daily activities. Carbohydrates are the brain’s number one energy source so cutting out carbs will zap your energy levels and leave you feeling fatigued. When carbs are limited excessively, you get really, really cranky. We also need carbohydrates to build muscle (in combination with sufficient protein in the diet and training). Fibre-rich carbohydrates such as fruits, some vegetables, legumes and wholegrain starches like oats, wild rice, and whole-wheat pasta are important for gut health. Let’s not forget that many carbs are also rich in other nutrients. If you restrict fruits, vegetables, and wholegrains then you are also limiting your intake of nutrients like vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. B-vitamins, vitamin C, beta-carotene, magnesium and other essential micro-nutrients are all found in carbohydrate-rich foods.”

Our ‘Fishcakes with Barley Salad and Lemon Drizzle’ recipe ticks all the boxes – high in fibre, packed with omega 3 fatty acids, heart healthy mono-unsaturated fatty acids, an array of vitamins and minerals and contains a great balance of protein, carbohydrate and fat; and besides that its good for the earth and tastes yummy!

 

Fishcakes2

Serves 4

FISHCAKES

Ingredients

1 x can (400 g) of mackerel (middle cut)

1/4 cup oat bran

1/2 cup grated carrot

1 free-range egg

Zest of 1 lemon

10 g chopped fresh herbs (chives, dill, parsley)

Salt & pepper

2 tablespoons avocado oil

How to make it

– drain the mackerel of any liquid, and put it into a large mixing bowl.

– using a fork, shred the fish up until it’s fine and there are no large chunks.

– add the oat bran, carrot, egg, lemon zest, and chopped herbs, and mix well. Leave the mixture to stand for a bout 30min in the fridge, so the oat bran soaks up excess liquid in the mixture.

– separate the mixture into 8 equal sized balls, and shape them into patties.

– season the fishcakes with salt & pepper.

– put a large non-stick frying pan onto a medium heat and drizzle the oil into the pan.

– once the pan is hot, add the fishcakes and fry on the first side for around 2 minutes, until golden brown. Turn them over and repeat on the other side.

BARLEY SALAD

Ingredients

1 cup cooked pearl barley, cold

40 g watercress

1/2 medium cucumber

1 avo

50 g almonds, raw & chopped

50 g mixed bean sprouts

100 g cherry tomatoes, cut in half

50 g sliced red onion

10 g basil

10 g fennel

100 g feta

Salt & pepper

How to make it

 – wash the cucumber, tomatoes, and herbs.

– using a peeler, shave the cucumber into ribbons.

– cut the avo in half, remove the skin & pip and cut the avo into chunks.

– in a large bowl, mix together the barley, cucumber ribbons, almonds, bean sprouts, tomatoes, onion, tear the fennel & basil up and add to the salad.

– assemble the salad on a platter. Spread the barley salad mixture on the bottom of the platter. Add the chunks of avo, and crumble the feta over the top of the salad. Sprinkle the watercress on top of the salad.

LEMON DRIZZLE

Ingredients

zest & juice of 1 lemon

1teaspoon smooth Dijon mustard

4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

1 teaspoon chopped chives

Salt & pepper

How to make it

– whisk together the lemon juice, zest & mustard.

– drizzle the olive oil into the lemon mixture whilst whisking.

– mix int he chopped chives, and season with salt & pepper.

 

Bon appetit!

To find a dietitian in your area who can assist you with a healthy eating lifestyle plan, visit www.adsa.org.za


Creamy Broccoli & Barley Soup

Our latest NutritionConfidence recipe is all about the super vegetable BROCCOLI. Part of the cruciferous vegetable family, broccoli has cancer-fighting power and may even help to improve memory. Together with a ‘made at home’ seed loaf this is a perfect family meal. 

WE LOVE IT!

If you could choose only one vegetable to remain after drought or famine, it would be a good idea to choose broccoli!

OUR DIETITIANS SAY….

Broccoli belongs to the cruciferous vegetable family (including kale, cauliflower, brussel sprouts, bok choy, cabbage, collard greens, rutabaga and turnips). They have a high nutrient density, which means that they are packed with vitamins (Vitamin A, C, K, Folate), minerals (potassium) and phytonutrients.

Eating a high amount of cruciferous vegetables has been associated with a lower risk of lung and colon cancer. Studies have suggested that sulforaphane, the sulfur-containing compound that gives cruciferous vegetables their bitter taste, is also what gives them their cancer-fighting power.

SOUP INGREDIENTS

300 g broccoli florets

15 ml olive oil

1 medium onion, peeled & chopped

100 ml water

100 ml reduced fat cream

1 sprig fresh thyme

5 g fresh parsley

1/2 cup cooked pearl barley

30 ml plain yoghurt for garnish

METHOD

  • Put the olive oil, thyme and onions into a medium pot on a medium heat.
  • Sweat the onions until soft and translucent. Add the broccoli, cream and water and put a lid on the pot.
  • Cook for 5min until the broccoli is soft.
  • Add the parsley, and remove from the heat.
  • Blend in small batches until smooth. Do not over fill the blender or it will come out the side of the blender!
  • Remove the soup from the blender back into the pot and season with salt and pepper.
  • Add the cooked barley and heat the soup. Serve with a dollop of yoghurt to garnish and fresh chopped herbs.

Serves 2 as a main or 4 as a starter.

Broccoli Soup (serves 2) – per serving:


Energy: 1050 kJ

Protein: 9.2 g

Carbohydrate 17.4 g

Total Fat: 13.2 g

Fibre: 8.4 g

Sodium: 62.5 mg

SEED BREAD INGREDIENTS (10 slices)

300 g stone ground bread flour

150 g stone ground whole wheat flour

5 g salt

20 g poppy seeds

30 g pumpkin seeds

20 g sesame seeds

20 g flax seeds

20 g sunflower seeds

25 g digestive bran

40 g rolled oats

1 sachet dried instant yeast

425 g water (lukewarm)

METHOD

  • Preheat the oven to 180 deg C.
  • In a large bowl, mix together the dry ingredients.
  • Make a well in the centre of the dry ingredients and add the lukewarm water.
  • Mix the dry ingredients into the water until all the ingredients are combined into a soft dough.
  • Grease a non-stick loaf pan and dust it with a little flour.
  • Pour the batter into the loaf pan and top with a few oat grains to decorate.
  • Put the loaf in a warm place to prove (rise) until nearly doubled in size.
  • Once your loaf has sufficiently risen, bake in the oven for 30-40min until deep brown and crusty.
  • Remove the loaf from the bread tin and place it in a wire rack to cool.

Bread, per slice (x10 slices per bread)

Energy: 984 kJ

Protein: 8 g

Carbohydrate: 37 g

Of which total sugars: 0.5 g

Total Fat: 5.4 g

Fibre: 6.3 g

Sodium: 199.2 mg

To download the recipe card, please visit: www.adsa.org.za/Public/Recipes.aspx


New NutritionConfidence recipe – Stuffed chicken breast wrapped in proscuitto

We love our latest NutritionConfidence recipe because it is the perfect easy-to-prepare option for a dinner party and is sure to wow guests.

This recipe is for special occasions and can be served with beautiful, seasonal vegetables, which at this time of the year include: asparagus, beetroot, broad beans, broccoli, brussel sprouts, fennel, Jerusalem artichokes, Kale spinach, parsnips, pumpkin, radishes, turnips and watercress.

Our dietitians say:

This is the lower fat version of bacon wrapped chicken breast stuffed with creamy feta and spinach. Leaner or lower fat protein options are used in this recipe – skinless chicken breasts instead of thighs; prosciutto ham instead of bacon; and Danish feta instead of Greek feta. To lower the saturated fat content of this recipe further, use reduced fat soft feta and remove excess visible fat from the prosciutto before cooking. Unfortunately the sodium content of this dish is high – the feta cheese and prosciutto ham being the main contributors. So rather keep this meal for special occasions!

Stuffed chicken breast wrapped in prosciutto

Makes 2 portions

Ingredients

2 free-range chicken breast fillets

100 g soft Danish style feta

100 g baby spinach

10 ml olive oil

4 long slices of prosciutto ham

Pepper

2 tablespoons chopped parsley

Zest of half a lemon

How to make it

  1. Heat a medium pan on a high heat.
  2. Add the olive oil and the baby spinach. Season the spinach with a pinch of pepper, and sauté the spinach until just wilted.
  3. Remove the spinach from the pan and put into a mixing bowl to cool. Once cooled, squeeze any excess liquid from the spinach and crumble the feta into the spinach. Add the lemon zest and parsley and mix to combine.4
  4. Preheat the oven to 180 deg C.
  5. Lay two slices of prosciutto onto a chopping board, slightly over lapping.
  6. Place the chicken breast on top of the prosciutto slices. Make a lengthways slit down the middle of each chicken breast, to butterfly it. Split the feta and spinach mix into two and stuff one half of the mixture into the chicken breast. Repeat the same process with the other chicken breast and stuff with the other half of the spinach mixture.
  7. Roll the chicken breast up, wrapping it in the prosciutto.
  8. Use a toothpick to pin and seal the ends of the chicken roll.
  9. Put a non stick pan on medium heat.
  10. Brown the chicken breasts for about 2 minutes until golden brown, turning them every couple of seconds for an even colour.
  11. Transfer the breasts into an oven proof dish and bake in the oven for 12 minutes.
  12. Remove from the oven and remember to remove the toothpicks.
  13. Serve with a fresh seasonal salad or side dish of your choice.

Nutritional Value (per portion)

Energy: 1063 kJ

Protein: 35.2 g

Carbohydrate: 2.1 g

Total Fat: 11.6 g

Dietary Fibre: 2.3 g

Sodium: 1082 mg

To download the recipe card, visit http://www.adsa.org.za

Next week we start with our new series of NutritionConfidence recipes that will be perfect for the coming Winter months.


Raw Chocolate Truffles

Spoil the one you love with some homemade ‘Raw Chocolate Truffles’ made from raw cocoa paste, dates, goji berries, raw almonds, sunflower seeds, flaxseeds, cinnamon and honey.

Our dietitians say:

Date flesh is a high source of energy and 100 g of flesh (about 4 mejool dates) can provide an average of 1300 kJ. It is rich in mainly fructose and glucose; low in fat and protein; and a good source of magnesium, potassium, copper, selenium and manganese. The consumption of 100 g of dates can provide over 15% of the recommended daily allowance from these minerals.

Vitamins B-complex (especially Vitamin B6) are the major vitamins in dates and they are an excellent source of dietary fiber (up to 8.0 g/100 g).

Last, but not least, dates are a good source of antioxidants, mainly carotenoids and phenolics.

We love this recipe:

Easy to make, package in a beautiful box and voila … a great gift for mom.

The raw chocolate balls are also a great dessert option – and can double up as a high energy lunchbox snack or perfect ‘take along’ energy boost for runners or cyclists.

Ingredients

100 g raw cocoa paste

100 g dates

30 g goji berries

50 g raw almonds, chopped

20 g sunflower seeds

20 g flaxseeds

2 ml cinnamon

20 g honey

*Makes 20 truffles

How to make it

– put the dates into a small saucepan and cover with a little water. Cook the dates in a medium high heat until soft (about 5 minutes) and the water has evaporated. Mash the dates into a purée and set aside.

– gently melt the cocoa paste on a low heat.

– mix the melted cocoa paste, date purée, goji berries, almonds, seeds, cinnamon and honey into a firm paste.

– roll the mixture into 15g balls and dust with cocoa powder, or roll in seeds or coconut to decorate.

The nutritional value per truffle (makes 20 truffles):

Energy: 254 kJ

Protein: 2 g

Carbohydrate: 4 g

Total fat: 3.2 g

Dietary Fibre: 1.1 g

Sodium: 48 mg


Sustainably Farmed Kob Stuffed with Fennel & Orange

Next up in our NutritionConfidence recipe series is a simple and tasty fish recipe from Chef, Vanessa Marx. This recipe is perfect for a gourmet meal that is also good for your health. An added bonus is that sustainably farmed kob is also good for the environment.

Our dietitians say:

There are many benefits to eating fish more often. Fish includes key micronutrients: mineral phosphorus, selenium, potassium, iodine, zinc and magnesium and vitamins B2, B12 and D.

The South African Healthy Eating Guidelines emphasise the importance of fish intake – it should be at the top of your list when choosing a protein for a meal.

The aim should be 2 – 3 portions of fish per week.

RECIPE

Makes 4 portions

1 whole sustainably farmed kob

1 medium fennel bulb, sliced

1 orange

1 lemon

20 g dill

20 g chives

30 g butter

50 ml olive oil

Salt & black pepper

Tin foil

– stuff the belly of the fish with the sliced fennel, chives and dill

– slice half of the orange and half of the lemon

– stuff the slices of citrus into the fish

– use the remaining half of the orange and lemon for the juice, and squeeze the juice over the fish

-rub the outside of the fish with butter and drizzle with olive oil

– season with salt & pepper

– wrap the fish up in 2 layers of foil

– place on the braai over medium to low coals for about 15 minutes, then turn the fish for a further 15 minutes

– unwrap the fish from the foil, taking care to reserve the juices which you can use to dress the fish when serving.

The nutritional value serves 4:

Energy: 1459 kJ

Protein: 23.7 g

Carbohydrates: 9 g

Total fat: 22.5 g

Fibre: 4 g

Sodium: 788 mg

To download the recipe card, visit http://www.adsa.org.za/Public/Recipes.aspx


Spinach, Beetroot & Pomegranate Salad

Just in time for the festive season a brand new NutritionConfidence recipe! A delicious Spinach, Beetroot & Pomegranate Salad from Vanessa Marx (Head Chef at Dear Me)!

We love it because the colourful salad contains a powerhouse of nutrients. ‘Good for you’ fats from the seeds and oil; phytochemicals, vitamins, minerals and fibre from the deep coloured veg; paired with a creamy, lower fat alternative to regular hard (previously known as) Greek style feta. And we love it because it looks so festive!

Good For You!

Deep coloured vegetables like beets and spinach contain many “non-nutrient” compounds called phytochemicals. These are biologically active, natural occurring chemical compounds which also provide the colour, taste and aroma to fruits and vegetables. In relation to cancer, phytochemicals help metabolise drugs, toxins, carcinogens and mutagens.

Also, beetroot juice may improve the performance for some athletes in some situations due to its high nitrate content.

 

Ingredients

100 g baby spinach

1 medium beetroot

50 g Danish feta cheese (lower in fat than Greek)

1 Pomegranate, or 100 g fresh pomegranate arils

50 g radishes

30 g baby spring onions

30 ml olive oil

10 ml raspberry or red wine vinegar (or other of your choice) – optional

 

How to make it

– Boil the whole beetroot, with the skin on, until soft (you should be able to pierce the beetroot with a knife effortlessly).

– Wash the baby spinach and pat off the excess water with some paper towel, or spin in a salad spinner if you have one.

– Wash the radishes and thinly slice them.

– Once your beetroot is cooked, leave it to cool slightly. While it’s still a bit warm, use your hands to rub the skin off the beetroot. Give the beetroot a rinse to remove the excess skin. Cut into small cubes.

– If you have a whole pomegranate, cut it in half. Hold the pomegranate half in your hand with the cut side toward your hand, leaving a gap between the pomegranate and the palm of your hand, by gripping the edges of the pomegranate with your fingertips. Hold the pomegranate over a large bowl, and using a large spoon, whack the back end of the pomegranate and the seeds will release from the shell. Repeat this until you have retrieved all of the jewels.

– On a plate or serving platter, arrange the baby spinach.

– Assemble your salad by adding the chopped beetroot, crumble over the feta, add the slices radishes, sprinkle over the pomegranate jewels and baby spring onions. Drizzle the salad with olive oil & vinegar & serve

Serves 2

Add this NutritionConfidence recipe card to your collection!

ADSA-recipes-spinach,beetroot,pom copy 2


Rooibos, Pomegranate & Cinnamon Iced Tea

With temperatures soaring across the country Summer is definitely in full swing. Our latest NutritionConfidence recipe is a refreshing, delicious Rooibos, Pomegranate & Cinnamon Iced Tea. We love it because it’s packed with flavour and the perfect alternative to sugar-sweetened ice tea!

Cinnamon, the spice hero:

Cinnamon provides a natural sweet taste to food and beverages, without adding calories and research suggests that cinnamon may have a beneficial effect on short term blood glucose control in type 2 diabetics. In traditional herbal medicine cinnamon is considered a remedy for respiratory, digestive and gynaecological ailments.

Ingredients

(Makes 2 L)

4 rooibos teabags

2 L water

1 cinnamon stick (+/- 5g)

1 orange, sliced with skin on

1 pomegranate, pitted

Honey, xylitol or sugar to taste (optional)

Ice to serve

How to make it

– Boil 2L of water.

– Put the tea bags into a large jug or bowl (min 2L), and add the boiling water.

– Add the cinnamon stick and orange slices.

– Leave the tea to cool to room temperature, or even better, leave to steep over night.

– Strain the tea to remove the teabags, cinnamon and orange

– Stir in honey, xylitol or sugar adding little bits at a time until the desired sweetness is reached. Diabetics, remember to use xylitol for a sugar-free option.

– Add the fresh pomegranate jewels and top up with ice to serve.

– Serve in large jars for a vintage feel and add some fresh herbs or edible flowers for a fresh summery touch.